Before John Green, his general category of realistic (non-fantasy) YA was rife with teen angst and “issues” fiction that you might have associated with the legendary Judy Blume, or with newer writers like Sarah Dessen or Laurie Halse Anderson. Anderson’s classic 1999 novel Speak, about a high schooler struggling to deal with the aftermath of sexual assault, was so influential that three years later Penguin launched an entire imprint named after it. One of the books launched under the behest of Speak was Green’s Looking for Alaska. But it’s Green whose name you’re more likely to know today, not Anderson’s, although Anderson has won more awards and written more books.



On Twitter, Green has 2 million followers. Compared to the rest of the leaders in Young Adult fiction, that number is staggering. To approach even half the Twitter influence of John Green all by himself, you need an entire army of YA women. Anderson, Blume, Dessen, Veronica Roth, Cassandra Clare, Richelle Mead, Margaret Stohl, Kami Garcia, Rainbow Rowell, Maureen Johnson, Malinda Lo, Holly Black, LJ Smith, Ellen Hopkins, Shannon Hale, Lauren Myracle, Libba Bray, Melissa Marr, and Leigh Bardugo: As a group these women only have about 1.2 million followers on Twitter.

That’s the voice of one man outweighing several decades of women who have had major successes, critical acclaim, and cultural influence.

"Young Adult Publishing and the John Green Effect" (via delicatedad)

When a man succeeds in a devalued (because of its association with women) field, he legitimizes it in popular opinion.

(via survivorsuperhero)

(via seananmcguire)

pacaprincess:

redefiningbodyimage:

otstudent:

ACCESS-A-WEDDING

Our offbeat wedding at a glance: My absolute favorite highlights of our wedding can be summed up in a few “D” words: dog, dress, decor, and disability. Our dog, Rush, is a trained service dog who helps my husband with a variety of day-to-day tasks. He came down the aisle with us and delivered the rings perfectly on cue, as if it was just a normal day of work. This of course was met with a 100 peoples’ collective awwws. Rush also toured the room with us and enjoyed many pats throughout the night. A true champion.

….

Finally, our focus on disability was a highlight for me. You can’t hide the fact that my husband spends most of his waking hours in his giant electric wheelchair (he has cerebral palsy), so we didn’t hide it — we celebrated it. We matched the wheelchair to our wedding colors, we took an accessible bus to the wedding, our food was finger food (which is easier for Tim to eat), and our cake was cake pops (also easier for Tim). We drank wine out of straws, and we even included Sign Language Interpreters in our ceremony. We celebrated disability and difference in all its forms.

read the full story at http://offbeatbride.com/2014/01/toronto-access-a-wedding

i have no words. what a beautiful celebration. 

Love this

That’s just REALLY cute. Especially snazzing up the wheelchair. Hey, got to look goooooooood. I love all the green! It’s so nice. <3

(via rj-anderson)

sphelm:

Current obsession is a collaboration between Gisella Velasco and Toni Potenciano called “FLY ART” which they describe as “The best marriage on the internet: hip hop and art”. The pair combines a few of my favourite things: matching lyrics from different hip hop songs with pieces of art, ranging from the Renaissance to Post-Modernism, and the result is amazing. Changing the context of the song and the piece introduce a really unexpected perspective, and I can’t get enough. These are a few of standouts (I am clearly drawn to Kanye and Beyoncé lyrics)

From Top: The Starry Night of Sierra Leone; Milkmaid Rollin That Body; Four N****s of the Apocalypse; One Good Venus; Princess Tarakanova In a Swimming Pool (Drank); The Paranoia; Get Lucky on a Summer Evening; Dont Kill Phaedra’s Vibe; H(eaven) Town Vicious; Bound 2 the Kiss

Dear white people:

Do please try to refrain from making jokes like “why do you hate white people?” when I discuss POC/WOC. You might not mean it and you might not realize you’re derailing the conversation. But regardless, you’re echoing words that I hear on a weekly basis from legitimately racist folks, words that have scoured at my mind and burned at my sense of self.

All for the sake of making a joke.

These are “just words” to you. So doesn’t that make them very easy for you not to use them?

They aren’t just words to me.

catagator:

Didn’t even get to close the search string before I was told I was wrong. 

(via seananmcguire)